Fenugreek cultivation

Fenugreek cultivation

Fenugreek belongs to the bean family Leguminosae and is widely grown as an annual plant in the world. It is a daily ingredient in almost every cuisine and its uses as a herb or as a spice is enormous. Its cultivation is simple and gives unimaginable benefits if carried in a proper manner. Apart from the seeds, the young pods are also well used as a vegetable or as a garnishing agent in different type of recipes. It is a semiarid crop and mostly supports dry weather conditions. So, lets see what are the favorable conditions for its cultivation.

Climate and soil
  • As it is a semiarid crop, mostly dry conditions are suitable for its farming.
  • This crop is also comfortable with frost free areas and cool weather conditions.
  • Areas with heavy or continuous rainfalls are completely avoidable.
  • Coming to soils, loamy lands with well water drainage system give high production of fenugreek.
  • Also soils which are rich in organic matter and has a pH value rang of 6 to 7 are ideal for its growth.
Land preparation
  • According to farming experts the best season for fenugreek would be October to November. At first, plough the land to a fine tilth so that previous weeds and wastes are removed.
  • Add 20 to 30 tons of natural manure before the last round and make appropriate beds and channel, usually these are of 3.5 to 1.5m size.
Sowing
  • Generally, 10 to 12 kilograms of seeds are required per hectare and these should be treated with a mixture of 1.5 kg Azospirillum and 50g Trichoderma viride per hectare to protect from diseases in the future.
  • Seeds are sown by maintaining a distance of 20x15cm followed by spraying of necessary herbicides to avoid the problem of weeds. This should be done on expert advice.
Fertilizers
  • According to experts, cover the top soil with 20 kilograms of Nitrogen after one month of sowing.
  • Give 20 to 30 tons of manure per hectare as a basal dose with the mixture of 30kg nitrogen, 25kg phosphorous and 40kg potassium.
  • Remember that the value of Nitrogen changes depending on the type of soil. It is advised to carry the soil test before going to this step.
Irrigation
  • This process starts immediately after sowing is done.
  • Second irrigation should be followed after two days of sowing the seeds.
  • From later on, it should be followed weekly once and care should be taken that there is no water logging in the field.
Harvesting
  • Generally methi leaves get harvested at the month end after sowing the seeds, where as the seeds get in to handy after 3 months.
  • At an average, you may have 3000 to 4500 kilograms of leaves and 450 to 750 kilograms of seeds per hectare.

Published Saturday, 27th October 2018